#125

Bear Lawyer Pores Over an Abstract

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4 responses to “#125

  1. That isn’t an abstract painting as it’s clearly representing a landscape.

  2. While he is not much of an art historian (don’t let the cape and beret ensemble fool you), Bear Lawyer would be willing to argue that Cézanne’s post-impressionist affinity for bold colours and geometric shapes—which comprise the backbone of the above-seen compositions—are, in fact, a basic form of abstract painting. Perhaps not as daring as the cubist portraits of Picasso or Matisse’s forays into Fauvism, but nevertheless an abstracted version of reality.

  3. In that case, couldn’t it be argued that any sort of image, even photography to a certain extent, are an abstraction of reality which necessarily highlights certain essentials of reality while muting others?

    • Certainly, in the cases of extreme close-ups, or when cropping, framing, rotation, filters, and/or post-production effects render the subject in such a way that its true identity or nature is obscured, hidden, or otherwise detached from the presented image, one could easily consider the camera’s far more literal translations of viewable reality (in comparison to painted canvas) as being artistically “abstract”, at least in the technical sense of the image being somehow disassociated from the original subject and therefore difficult to comprehend or understand in full. But one should not be so liberal with the term as to consider any image qua image as being “abstract” simply because it is a static and/or flat reproduction of reality.

      Again, Bear Lawyer is not an art historian, but, like any good attorney, he most certainly does enjoy mincing words.

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